Article

01.09.2020

Het Anker, ready for a 'golden' future

Achieving sustainable growth and professionalisation and yet retaining your individuality? Het Anker Brewery did just this with the support of BNP Paribas Fortis Private Equity.

Het Anker, established in Mechelen city centre, is not just a brewery. Within the walls of the ‘Grand Beguinage’, designated a UNESCO world heritage site, stands not only the brewery but also a three-star hotel and a welcoming brasserie with a shop. Guide tours of the site are also organised.

The Mechelen family brewery that has been producing beer for five generations is known worldwide for its ‘Gouden Carolus’  specialty beers, which have won multiple awards. Since 2010, Het Anker has also been making single-malt whisky based on the mash from Gouden Carolus Tripel beer at De Molenberg distillery, the 17th-century family farm in Blaasveld.

These successes did not happen just like that. To record this growth and further develop the activities, manager Charles Leclef sought advice from the firm’s main bank, BNP Paribas Fortis. The many years of cooperation, the bank’s knowledge of this sound Belgian SME and a shared vision of sustainability resulted in an even closer relationship. In June 2016, BNP Paribas Fortis Private Equity joined the business via a capital increase. This gave Het Anker the financial scope to implement its expansion plans for the brewery and the distillery activities along sustainable lines. The cooperation with BNP Paribas Fortis Private Equity led to further professionalisation in terms of reporting and governance, while still enabling the business to retain its family identity.

 

Supporting growth

Financing companies and supporting their growth: this is the aim of BNP Paribas Fortis Private Equity. “We provide a financial input in the form of capital or mezzanine financing and we assist and support companies in the long term with the implementation of their strategy and business plan”, says Laurens Boriale, Investment Manager at BNP Paribas Fortis Private Equity. “In every business, we strive to create value by offering our operational and financial skills, placing our international network at their disposal or enabling them to call upon our expertise, which we have built up over several decades.”

Family anchorage

Private Equity is an excellent way of investing in the real economy and reinforcing the SME fabric. What is more, it complements family shareholdings and bank financing. “Our investment is a solution to ensure that the business retains its family anchorage in the future. So the capital increase at Het Anker is a perfect illustration of the BNPP Fortis Private Equity investment approach.”

Fine outlook

Het Anker was immediately won over by the private equity idea. Charles Leclef: “We are grateful that the bank wants to work with us so closely and shares our vision of the future. Sustainability is a central concern for us, too. BNP Paribas Fortis has been our financial partner for over 30 years and once again this time, they thought very constructively and creatively about options for the further growth of Het Anker. I am convinced that the new investment round is preparing us for a ‘golden’ future led by the next generation.” 

Article

04.01.2021

Robovision: “Within five years artificial intelligence will have become omnipresent”

Robovision has emerged as the best-known AI player in the Benelux countries. However, this young firm has an even more extensive vision. “Healthcare, agriculture, the environment… within five years artificial intelligence will have become omnipresent,” foresees CEO Jonathan Berte. BNP Paribas Fortis is an important partner in their growth.

Jonathan Berte, who trained as a civil engineer, smiles as he thinks back to the pioneering years at Robovision. “In fact, when I was a kid I had a really analytical mindset. In the scouts and at school I used to keep note of absolutely everything. It was really important for me to collect information. I was a kind of ‘infoholic’. But just gathering information gets you nowhere. That also goes for information that’s just stored on hard disks. The added value comes from using that information efficiently.”

How exactly do you do that at Robovision?

“Technology is evolving at lightning speed. These days just about everybody has a smartphone in their trouser pocket.  Apart from anything else, these devices create a great deal of information, so we need to keep up on the algorithmic front and artificial intelligence helps us with that. That’s how we can provide governments, institutions and companies large and small with a platform for automated decision-making on the basis of visual data. In addition we constantly ask ourselves how we can democratise artificial intelligence. So in a way we’re like the Airbnb of artificial intelligence.”

What might that visual data be for example?

“In May, in collaboration with the University of Antwerp and security firm Securitas, we set up a smart camera in a shopping street in order to measure to what extent people were complying with social distancing requirements. This is important information for the decision makers in this country. Of course we don’t have to look through the images ourselves.  We get them analysed using a specific type of artificial intelligence – self-teaching algorithms or what are known as  neural networks. They’re designed somewhat along the lines of our own brains, though not nearly as complex.” 

Which brings us to the fashionable expression ‘deep learning’.  Are machines eventually going to make themselves smarter than us humans?

“Oh, that’s already underway at this very moment – in radiology, among other fields, plus also in games. Remember the legendary Go match between South Korean grandmaster Lee Sedol and a computer, which was beautifully represented in the 2017 documentary film AlphaGo? We’re also focusing on deep learning, because neural networks are very efficient at dealing with visual data. However, it will be some time yet before AI can equal a human being in intuition for instance.”

You’ve now evolved from a startup to a scaleup. Where do you want to be in five years’ time?

 “The society of tomorrow will be one in which everything will be properly measured and dealt with. For instance, we’re also working in the field of horticulture, where AI can be applied in quality control – to spot fruit with an abnormal shape or colour, say. Lots of agricultural and horticultural businesses have got into difficulties over the last few months because pickers from Eastern Europe weren’t able to enter this country. Those businesses will very probably be investing in AI and automation over the next few years. In these kinds of fields, the coronavirus has taken us to a digital society almost overnight.”

What sort of partners do you need in order to succeed in your aims?

“During our growth from startup to scaleup, BNP Paribas Fortis has always been an important partner. You have really taken a lot of trouble to understand our story. Of course you do need to grasp our plans from a banking standpoint in order to be able to assess the risks. But quite apart from that, I have the feeling that you’re particularly good when it comes to supporting the whole tech and startup scene.” 

Article

15.12.2020

Sunglasses that can help save the oceans

Yuma Labs makes sunglasses from recycled PET bottles. The Belgian firm has grown from a one-man startup into a company that manufactures items for other brands as well. But can the firm combine growth with sustainability? At BNP Paribas Fortis we certainly think so.

Yuma Labs (originally named YR Yuma) is the brainchild of Sebastiaan de Neubourg, explains his business partner Lenja Doms. She tells us: "Sebastiaan was working as a consultant, but he was itching to set up his own business.  His idea was to use a 3D printer to make sunglasses from recycled plastic. He then found out at first hand why no-one had tried this before. Because it proved to be quite a bit harder than expected,” laughs Lenja.

Crowdfunding

By 2017 Sebastiaan had a workable prototype and he started a crowdfunding campaign for his sustainable sunglasses. It was an immediate hit.  However, the project wasn’t first and foremost about achieving successful sales, reveals Lenja. “Sebastiaan saw the sunglasses primarily as a tool for making people aware of the basic principles of the circular economy. There’s no such thing as waste. A used Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottle provides the raw material for a new product, such as a pair of sunglasses.” And to complete the circle, the customer is encouraged to trade the sunglasses back in at the end of their life, in exchange for a new pair at an attractive discount.

More expensive

Sustainable manufacturing, as Yuma Labs does it, inevitably means that the final product is more expensive. “Fully twice as expensive,” Lenja points out, explaining: “We certainly don’t want to see the circular economy pigeon-holed as the province of the elite. We already take account of the entire life-cycle of a product, and we take responsibility for the recycling and re-use of the materials.  And let’s be quite clear about this: that’s more costly than just putting a product on the market without worrying about what happens to it later.”

Aiming for growth

In summer 2019, Lenja Doms and Ronald Duchateau came on board the Yuma team. This provided an opportunity to broaden the focus and look further than the consumer market. This month, Yuma Labs announced a collaborative project with a major fashion company. This upscaling will enable Yuma Labs to reach out to a much larger audience.

A good mix

In order to grow, a business needs financial resources. Yuma Labs has looked into quite a number of possible solutions, says Lenja. “These days there are a lot of initiatives designed to support sustainable businesses – from banks, the government and private investors. We’ve always tried to find the right balance between our own capital and external finance, and to achieve a good mix of different forms of finance between capital, grants and loans.”

Lenja has a golden tip for other businesspeople in the circular economy: "All too often I observe that the economic side of the story is neglected because companies keep on trying to find the perfect solution or the perfect product. There’s no sense in that.  You shouldn’t try to be whiter than white.”

Creating added value

At BNP Paribas Fortis, Maxime Prové is the Account Manager for Yuma Labs. He endorses Lenja Doms’ view on this. “Entrepreneurs who set out to do sustainable or social business must also have a desire to create added value, otherwise the business won’t last,” Maxime points out, underlining: “You can’t pursue a sustainable, environmental or social business model unless it’s underpinned by a profit-making scenario. That’s the only way you’ll be able to grow, hire more people and make a greater impact.”

Photo: Karel Hemerijckx

Article

07.12.2020

Scale-up concludes mega contract in the midst of the coronavirus crisis

The Antwerp-based scale-up IPEE transforms ordinary toilets into innovative products. BNP Paribas Fortis is more than just the financial partner. IPEE have already come into contact with the right people via the bank’s network several times.

“The traditional urinal has no brain. The infrared eye simply detects that someone is standing in front of the urinal. The result? A lot of wasted water and misery”, says Bart Geraets, who founded IPEE in 2012 together with Jan Schoeters.

The scale-up devised new measuring technology that makes it possible to detect through the ceramic of a urinal when someone is urinating or when the urinal is blocked. With this innovative technology, the scale-up designed urinals that use half as much water and toilets that can be operated without touching them.

Sleek design

“IPEE is an atypical scale-up that innovates in a sector where little has changed in the past few decades”, says Conchita Vercauteren, relationship manager at the BNP Paribas Fortis Innovation Hub.

Jan Schoeters: “At first we mainly focused on durability. But we soon felt that with non-residential applications, the potential water saving is subordinate to the operational aspect. We had to be able to offer added value for each stakeholder in the purchasing process.”

We opted for sleek designs to appeal to architects and end users. The simple installation attracts fitters and maintenance people see the advantages of the sleek design - that is easy to clean - and toilets that do not overflow.

New investors

Until 2015, Schoeters and Geraets, along with Victor Claes, an expert in measuring methods and originator of the IPEE technology, put their energy into product development and market research. The financing came mainly from money that they collected in their network of friends, fools and family.

They had to go elsewhere to obtain the funds for production and marketing. Geraets: “We had a product, but it wasn’t ready to sell. To take that step, we needed investors.”

Looking for new investors was a challenge. Schoeters: “We aren’t software developers and we don’t work in a sexy sector. So we miss out with a large target group of investors.”

The young scale-up attracted the attention of Ronald Kerckhaert, who had sold his successful company, Sax Sanitair, at the end of 2015. “He pushed us to think big, more than we dared ourselves. And he never headed for an exit. His express goal was to put our product on the world market”, says Schoeters.

Growth path

IPEE has achieved impressive growth since then. The product range was expanded and new sectors were broached: educational institutes, office buildings and hospitals. The technology is now used by Kinepolis, Texaco, Schiphol and Changi Airport (Singapore).

“We very soon turned to Asia, because new technology is embraced more quickly there”, Geraets explains. The IPEE technology is distributed in Singapore - where the scale-up has its own sales office - China, Thailand and Vietnam, among other places. About half the turnover comes from abroad, although the coronavirus crisis will leave its mark this year.

Supporter

“My biggest headache is achieving healthy growth”, says Bart Geraets. One advantage for IPEE is that in coronavirus times, hygiene stands high on the agenda. The scale-up's  touchless toilet facilities meet that demand.

At the same time, the shortage of water and the need to use water sparingly is very topical. Geraets: “We notice that in these strange times we are gaining an even bigger foothold. In the midst of the coronavirus crisis we concluded a contract with the world’s biggest manufacture of toilet facilities. Now it’s a matter of further professionalising our business, the personnel policy and the marketing.”

The company’s main bank is an important partner here. Schoeters: “It is more than just a financial organisation. We have already come into contact with the right people via the bank’s network several times. Our bank feels more like a supporter that is also putting its weight behind our story.”

Article

16.11.2020

Ghent-based biotechnology is about to conquer America

In the past few years, Biotalys has worked hard on the first biological product devised to protect crops. This product will first be launched in the United States. Via its Innovation Hub BNP Paribas Fortis offers the company the necessary financing solutions and assist with their international expansion.

By the end of the year Biotalys aims to submit the dossier to the EPA, the independent federal agency of the United States in charge of protecting public health and the environment for the approval and marketing of its first product, the biofungicide BioFun-1.

A biological alternative to chemical pesticides

The young biotech firm has developed with this product a biological alternative to the chemical pesticides currently used to combat the botrytis fungus that affects strawberries, grapes, tomatoes and other plants. The product can also extend the storage time. “We really are pioneers in the agricultural biotech industry. We innovate using a technology that no-one else has yet developed. We aren’t copycats”, says Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) Hilde Revets.

Biotalys – formerly known as Agrosavfe – was set up in 2013 as a spin-off of the Flemish Institute for Biotechnology. The company now has 50 employees, around 45 of whom work at the headquarters in Ghent. A team is still working in the United States to prepare for the marketing of the first product there.

Requested by consumers and governments

The biotech company hopes that its new, effective biological products – which are also safer for people and the environment – will capture a substantial share of the pesticides market, replacing conventional chemical substances. Such alternatives are needed, too, given the increasing resistance to chemical pesticides among consumers and governments. “The European Union is looking for alternative pesticides. In this sense, the European Green Deal is in marvellous thing for us”, says Chief Operating Officer (COO) Luc Maertens.

American market first

Nevertheless, the biotech company is setting its sights on the American market first. “This is simply because the European regulation process takes far longer and is far more complex. In Europe, it takes at least three to four years to obtain approval, compared with 18 months in the United States. So we will be able to start by launching our first biofungicide, BioFun-1, in the United States in 2022.”

A broad pipeline with various products

The end of the year is an exciting time, with the submission of the dossier for the approval of BioFun-1 in the United States. “But of course, ours is not a single product company”, Revets assures us. “We are developing a broad pipeline with various products that we can use to protect plants and crops against major fungi, bacteria and insects.”

Demonstrating value

For CEO Patrice Sellès, ensuring this pipeline is one of the biggest challenges straight away. “As with every biotech company, it takes a great deal of effort and substantial investments before there is enough income to stand entirely on our own two feet. At the same time, agricultural biotechnology, the field in which we work, receives far less attention than medical biotechnology. So another major challenge is to demonstrate to the rest of the world that our technology is very valuable.”

Attract additional capital

Until now it has been fine, because the biotech company is supported by various Belgian and international investors. “They support us in our growth and understand that developing a product pipeline requires major investments. But we are gradually coming to the point where we have to look at various possibilities to attract additional capital.” This is one of the challenges facing the new CFO straight away.

Role of the Innovation Hub

One of the partners in this process is BNP Paribas Fortis, which also assists the biotech company in its Innovation Hub. Relationship manager Koen: “Our role is to offer the company the necessary financing solutions and assist with their international expansion. For instance, we recently provided financing for the new laboratory. This way, the company retains sufficient liquid assets to really focus fully on the core activities - the development of very advanced green biotechnology.”

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