Article

18.04.2018

How to instil the start-up mind-set?

Although originally, hackathons were restricted to the small community of developers and geeks, the phenomenon has gathered momentum to become a real catalyst for agile innovation for companies.

Over the last few years, hackathons - contraction of the words "hack" (from "hack away") and "marathon" - have become commonplace. In practical terms, hackathons bring together various talents (entrepreneurs, developers, web designers, graphic designers, etc.) around the development of an IT project. Arranged into teams, the participants have a limited amount of time (from a few hours to a few days) to develop a prototype, a piece of software or an app on a given theme. To stimulate competition, the event generally finishes with the presentation of the results to a jury of experts and the selection of the winners. Intensity, co-creation and inventiveness are the buzzwords.

Not only for start-ups

In Belgium, it is estimated that since 2011 nearly 150 hackathons have taken place, a third of which were in 2017. A boom that can notably be explained by the growing interest from companies of all sizes and from all sectors, and even public institutions. And on the grounds that these development surges represent an excellent way of instilling innovation and agility specific to start-up companies. Whether they are internal (for employees only) or public, these events give an opportunity for experimenting with other ways of tackling a problem, finding solutions and putting them into practice. All while strengthening collaboration and team spirit. But it's more than developing a new product, it's an opportunity to think outside the box, as well as to give a boost to the digital transformation process. For large corporations, it's also an excellent lever for detecting and integrating the talent of tomorrow. So it's not by chance that hackathons are diversifying and becoming more professional.

All sectors are jumping in!

By adopting this type of event, big companies are seeking to connect to the ecosystem of digital start-ups. All sectors are doing it and there are countless examples... Thus, the 3rd BNP Paribas International Hackathon, which took place in 2017 across 10 international towns and cities, invited participants to improve the efficiency of banking products and services. Another example: "Hack my ride", arranged by the STIB (Brussels Intermunicipal Transport Company) in 2017 and dedicated to public transport, whose objective was to develop digital apps by using data published by the public body's open data platform. In 2018, Hack Belgium will hold its second event, devoted to the social issues of tomorrow. On the programme: 1,500 hackathonians united around 12 big challenges linked to various facets of society: energy, circular economy, employment, media, finance, education, healthcare, etc.

Maintaining the dynamic

Although "hackathons" or other "start-up weekends" are very good at stimulating innovation for companies, the real issue is maintaining the dynamic. Indeed, although it is crucial to orientate the event towards a tangible output, this is rarely fully achieved at the end of the hackathon. The company should therefore seize the winning project - or even other ideas brought to light during the competition - in order to integrate it into an internal innovative process. In collaboration with the participating team, the objective is to pursue the development of the prototype, to support it and to make it succeed. By way of example, the BNP Paribas International Hackathon gave the prizewinners the chance to be involved in the bank's acceleration programme, in order to follow the development of the prototype presented during the hackathon, with the aim of creating a solution deployed within the company or with customers.

Article

18.07.2016

Disruptive innovation: J.S. Bach versus The Rolling Stones

Established companies engage in incremental innovation; start-ups engage in disruptive innovation. It is a fight between David and Goliath, and we all know how that turned out.

Imagine a lush meadow under the spring sunshine. Two professional musicians in smart suits are playing Sonata for flute and harpsichord by Johann Sebastian Bach. Suddenly those sweet sounds are ripped to shreds by an electric guitar. It is the well-known riff from Start Me Up, the hit song by The Rolling Stones. When the bass and drums also join in, the classical music perishes in an orgy of electrically amplified instruments. Keith Richards' furrowed face is lit by a wicked grin.

The fantastic music by J.S. Bach symbolises the established companies here. Their approach is well-considered; their products are polished. They have built a longstanding relationship of trust with their customers. Everyone thinks that they can continue like this for a very long time to come. Is The Rolling Stones' music as great as Bach's? That is certainly up for discussion. In any case their music is different. Rough, less polished, aiming for a direct impact. And certainly not less commercial. The rock songs by Jagger and Richards symbolise the young start-ups here. They disrupt the peace of the established companies and sometimes even bring the biggest players down.

Playing by different rules

The Rolling Stones were innovative. They revamped the old blues, consciously cultivated their bad boy image and made good use of the mass media to put themselves out there in the market. They were disruptive – rupturing and devastating – before their time. Of course, classical music also uses modern recording and distribution techniques, but that is more of an incremental innovation, a gradual change. The product itself does not evolve much anymore. The difference between these two notions – incremental and disruptive innovation – is essential for companies, according to Cedric Donck, business angel and founder of the Virtuology Academy.

"Established companies engage in incremental innovation. They improve their products or services step by step, but they stay in the same business model. In the hotel sector, this means we make sure our rooms have Wi-Fi, we are on TripAdvisor, we have an attractive website and so on.

Start-ups engage in disruptive innovation. They play by different rules. One example is Airbnb. Another are the banks. They try to outdo each other with apps and other digital innovations, which are necessary, but not enough. Disruptive players such as Lendio offer peer-to-peer money lending to companies without the involvement of a traditional bank. This type of 'uberisation' is emerging everywhere. Disruptive innovation cannot be stopped."

How different is disruptive innovation?

  • Disruptive innovation never emerges from the sector itself
    Spotify was not established in the music industry, Uber was not created by a taxi company, The Huffington Post is not part of the conventional media world and Tesla is not the result of a car manufacturer. Disruption wiping the floor with existing companies does not arise from those companies themselves.
  • There is a fundamental difference in the vision of technology
    In conventional companies, technology supports the organisation's business or marketing and is often a source of irritation or frustration. The CTO is rarely part of the board of directors. Start-ups are actually based on new technology (big data, artificial intelligence, new algorithms, robotics, etc.) and wonder, what can we do with it?
  • The innovation is accelerating
    Innovative companies are sometimes beaten themselves. Apple did not see Spotify coming. Google was outdone by WhatsApp in terms of speed. Disruptive companies are not immune to disruption themselves, and this process is only getting faster.
  • Start-ups are currently finding it easy to raise money
    Starters who can prove that their good idea has great business sense are currently finding it relatively easy to raise money in order to develop their idea. Being large and financially strong are no longer advantages.
Article

18.07.2016

Disruptive innovation: the Build - Measure - Learn cycle

In the lean start-up method, an imperfect minimum viable product is quickly tested on the market, modified and tested again until it is right. Or until the product is dropped.

In established companies, internal innovation tends to be top-down. The directors make a decision and instruct middle management, which passes the task on to the staff. Then it moves up, back down and up again several times. No wonder innovation takes so long. What's more, the initiative is taken by the management. This does not always guarantee that the market actually needs it.

Start-ups approach things differently. They see things through the customer's eyes, think about their problems and wonder how they can come up with a solution as a company. This hypothesis is tested in the market as a minimum viable product (MVP). An MVP is not perfect, but that's fine – its aim is to show whether there is a need for it. By measuring the right parameters, the product can be modified quickly and tested again. And modified again. This development cycle is often referred to as the Build – Measure – Learn loop. The start phase mainly focuses on finding out whether the product has a future. In start-up methodology, this is called pivot or persevere: to take a different direction or to continue down the same path.

Article

18.07.2016

Working with the lean start-up method: the right approach

Working with the lean start-up method in an established company can mean questioning and if necessary aborting one's own business model. This is not easy, but there is little choice.

It is not easy to apply the lean start-up ideas at an existing company. They can cause disruption, and not many companies are willing to cause damage to themselves. However, there is no choice: those not engaging in disruptive innovation may end up being wiped out or eaten up by the competitors that do. In 2013, The Washington Post, a venerable institution with 180 years of experience and Pulitzer prizes galore, was simply bought by Jeff Bezos, the man behind Amazon.

The Washington Post, a venerable institution with 180 years of experience and Pulitzer prizes galore, was simply bought by Jeff Bezos, the man behind Amazon.

So what is the best approach? Cedric Donck, business angel and founder of the Virtuology Academy, lists five recommendations.

  1. Get a top management sponsor
    Real innovation means doing things differently. The team engaging in a lean start-up will certainly cause conflict with conservative forces, resisting legal and compliance departments and established departments defending their territories. Not all business structures are in the company's best interest. When the going gets tough, the team must count on the support of the top management sponsor to put their foot down when necessary.
  2. Put together a dynamic, diverse team
    The lean start-up team is preferably a mix of dynamic, internal and external people. The internal people know the company and the external people offer a fresh perspective from the outside. All company levels (production, sales and marketing, legal, etc.) must be represented. This allows any stumbling blocks to be examined and resolved quickly from all the necessary angles. A good relationship between the young and old and the different levels also helps.
  3. Start from a different place
    Engaging in innovation outside the company has no impact, but inside the company, the whole thing might collapse due to all kinds of delay mechanisms. Sometimes it is a good idea to start in a different place until a critical mass has been reached. About fifty people are often a good gauge. After that the team can be incorporated and integrated again. Processes (compliance, quality, accounting, etc.) must then be established, which will certainly benefit from the expertise of a big company. Timing is crucial: too early and you smother the new team, too late and the growth will make it explode.
  4. Train the team in a lean start-up
    Several lean start-up methods have been developed in recent years. Many of them are included in Cedric Donck's top ten books.
  5. Look for the most fertile ground for disruptive innovation
    The objective of disruptive innovation is to have as much impact as possible with as little input as possible. To do this, you need to look for fertile ground.

We can quote Nike in this respect: just do it! Note, however, that you will have to dispel two popular myths.

  • I must not make any mistakes
    Create a culture in which mistakes are not penalised: innovation is impossible without failures. Do perform a post-mortem analysis on why something was unsuccessful and what you can learn from it.
  • I can only present a perfect product
    Do not be afraid to present an imperfect product. Customer discovery and product improvement are central to the whole exercise. Your customer will be pleased to help develop your product.
Article

18.07.2016

Disruptive innovation in 4 quotes

We conclude with some provocative quotes by business angel Cedric Donck. Food for thought...

"Disruptive innovation should keep all established companies awake at night. And they need to step out of their comfort zone. People are finally starting to realise this now. French telecom group Orange has joined forces with an insurance group to set up a mobile-only bank. And media company Medialaan recently acquired mobile operator Mobile Vikings. Who would have predicted this three years ago?"

"Everyone is always talking about Amazon or Zalando, but some conventional companies have been engaging in disruptive innovation for decades. IBM sold mainframe computers in the 1970s and personal computers in the '80s and '90s. After that they moved to consulting. In the next four years they will be investing one billion euros in the artificial intelligence of their supercomputer Watson. IBM is sometimes considered a dinosaur, but that's not the case: it's a company that reinvents itself every ten years."

"Some start-ups focus only on increasing their market share without making a profit. That is like playing the lottery. There really is a different way. An internet company such as Immoweb grew steadily in a healthy way without too much fuss in the press. A couple of years ago, German media group Axel Springer, publisher of Bild and Die Welt, paid 130 million euros for a majority stake. Congratulations, is what I say to that. Unfortunately, many journalists only praise start-ups that are raising millions, even if they have no decent business case to show for it. In my opinion, raising money is gaining permission to operate at a loss. Spending someone else's money is hardly something to be proud of. Swedish scientists have recently analysed how start-ups established in 2008 were doing in 2013. The conclusion was that the more capital they had, the less they had achieved five years later. If you have too much money, you start to believe your own story and your own fantasies. If you have little money, you need to listen to your customers very carefully, and that is the best way to achieve success."

"Belgium is not doing badly. Big players such as BNP Paribas Fortis are launching internal initiatives, with Home for Innovation one example. Rather than business angels like me, they have more leverage to support their start-ups. The government is also starting to do what it needs to do. The tax shelter for start-ups is a tax scheme to encourage young entrepreneurship. Investors in Belgian start-ups will receive personal income tax benefits. When things are done right, this certainly deserves a mention."

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