Article

17.08.2017

Start preparing for GDPR

The General Data Protection Regulation comes into force in 2018 and has major implications for companies' IT systems. Here are the best practices to be introduced.

GDPR: what is it?

The General Data Protection Regulation comes into force on 25 May 2018. It defines, strengthens and unifies the protection policy for personal data within the Member States of the European Union. Its preparation has not been easy: it has required four years of legislative negotiations.

What is in the new document?

The regulation adopted on 26 April 2016 can be consulted here. Overall, it defines a harmonised framework of data protection rules, with extra-territorial application. It also introduces the 'right to delete' personal data quickly. There is also the right of portability of personal data, notifications for cases of data breach and stronger financial penalties (up to 4% of a company's global annual turnover) in the event of non-compliance.

GDPR means significant changes to the IT systems of companies of all sizes, mainly in terms of data management and governance.

How to prepare for it

  • Capture and integrate: the extended consent requires data to be taken into account at all levels (internet, targeted offers, invoicing, marketing) in order to reconcile it transversally.
  • Classify and map: companies should define and categorise data and locate it within their systems (source, use).
  • Make data anonymous: companies should detect the presence of sensitive data (personal address, credit card) to avoid problems of data confidentiality before displaying this sensitive data.
  • Ensure portability: customers must be able to access their data for possible requests for changes or deletion. To achieve this, a data integration tool is essential.
  • Appoint a Data Protection Officer (DPO), an expert within the company whose job is to control data protection.

Like to know more?

The Privacy Commission has published a guide in 13 steps, available in French and in Dutch.

Article

23.08.2016

Capital Markets Union: It’s Not About Us, It’s About You

How to harmonize capital markets and regulation across Europe? Petra De Deyne, Regulatory Affairs Manager for Global Markets at BNP Paribas, presents the new initiative of the European Commission to build a single market for all 28 Member States of the Union.

After the crisis of 2007-2008, financial stability was the key priority for the European Commission. In order to restore that stability, the resilience of banks needed to be strengthened and systemic risk in the markets needed to be contained, which had Brussels produce that famous “tsunami” of regulation. Today, most of the work to make banks and markets stable again is done and the respective legislation has been or will soon be implemented.

Growth as a priority

The next item on the European Commission’s to-do list is now to create growth. Therefore, corporates need to grow their businesses, invest and expand. Historically, corporates have been very much dependent on bank lending if they want to expand. However, on the back of capital and liquidity requirements imposed by bank regulation, some banks have found it more difficult to fulfil their role of traditional lender. Seeing their bank funding channels drying up, larger corporates turned to capital markets, but did not always meet favourable borrowing conditions and interested investors. For some of the smaller corporates, getting funding had become as good as impossible. A survey done by the ECB and the European Commission in 2014 on the access to finance of enterprises (SAFE) showed that 35% of SMEs did not get the full financing they asked their banks for in 2013.

Looking at the US, we notice that corporates get about three quarters of their funding directly from the capital markets, and rely only to a small extent on bank lending. In Europe the situation is the other way round. So Europe wondered if they could create a funding landscape that would resemble more the US situation. That would mean that those in need of financing would meet directly with those that have money to invest. It would reduce the dependency of the real economy on banks, which would again contribute to financial stability. However, what is needed in that case is a harmonized, well integrated capital market in Europe. And this is where comes in the initiative of the European Commission: build a Capital Markets Union.

So in short, this is what CMU is about: it is a plan to create a single market for all 28 Member States of the European Union, where, on the one hand, funding choices for corporates will be diversified beyond bank lending and where, on the other hand, investment opportunities and the investor base will be broadened.

So what’s the plan?

“The Plan”, which the European Commission published in October 2015, sets 4 clear objectives:

  1. Support job creation and growth
  2. Connect financing effectively to investment projects across the EU
  3. Make the financial system more stable
  4. Deepen financial integration and increase competition

“The Plan” also defines 5 priority areas for action, with over 30 different initiatives for reviews, assessments, reports, initiatives and legislative proposals, all to be taken between now and sometime in 2018.

The first priority is to provide more funding choices for Europe’s corporates and SMEs. Here we will see initiatives to support venture capital and innovative forms of financing, such as crowdfunding. The EU is also thinking about ways to provide necessary data on SMEs to investors, so that they can make well informed investment decisions.

Second, long term investment has to be promoted. An initiative here is to make sure that capital requirements for insurers are reviewed so that they see their investment needs more efficiently met. Measures will also be taken to promote investment in infrastructure projects.

Third, the range of investment choices both for retail and institutional investors has to broaden. In this area, we will see, amongst others, incentives to promote pensions savings and private placements.

The fourth priority is to enhance the capacity of the banks to step up lending. This may sound contradictory, as the idea of the CMU is to move away from traditional lending. However, for a lot of SMEs, banks will still remain the prime source of financing. So Europe wants to make sure that banks can offload more assets from their balance sheet so that they have extra space to lend.

And lastly, the EU wants to dismantle barriers that would hamper cross-border investment across the Member States. This is quite an ambitious area, where certain tax issues will be tackled, and where we will see a certain harmonization as far as national insolvency laws and securities laws are concerned.

Immediate action

Simultaneously with the publication of “The Plan”, the European Commission issued a couple of legislative proposals and 3 consultations, as a matter of launching the short term actions right away and getting the train out of the station.

The European Commission takes immediate action in the field of securitization. This may seem quite controversial as some will still consider this as the root of all evil. However, it is a critical tool to finance the economy and it sits high on the Commission’s agenda. In order to kick start the securitizations market, the EU has come up with a legislative proposal, the purpose of which is twofold:

  • First, it aims at reinstalling confidence. Therefore, a quality label is introduced: “Simple, Transparent and Standardized” securitizations. That means that any “STS” securitisation will comply with over 20 different standards, thus helping investors to better understand these products and ensuring quality. Second, it incentivizes banks to restart the activity again by giving these STS securitizations a better capital treatment, compared to other forms of securitisation.
  • Next to that, the EU has issued a proposal to adjust Solvency II rules for insurers, so that they would have to deploy less capital when investing in long term infrastructure projects or in European Long Term Investment Funds (ELTIFs).

Also note that the European Commission is looking into covered bonds. Currently there are 26 different covered bond frameworks in the EU, an area which could possibly benefit from a certain level of harmonization. While the idea is not to create a single framework for Europe, the Commission would look to promote best practices, step up transparency and remove barriers that would hamper cross-border investments. We also saw a consultation venture capital and a call for evidence on the cumulative impact of financial legislation.

Reduce paperwork

In the medium term, a review of the Prospectus Directive is on the cards. This is a logical move, given that the EU would like to attract many more corporates directly onto the capital markets to issue debt. Making prospectuses cheaper and less burdensome for smaller issuers on the one hand and more user friendly for investors on the other hand, would be a welcome help in that respect.

Another initiative is a Green Paper (this is a first, general exchange of views between the EC and the industry to explore a certain topic) on Retail Financial Services. Here he European Commission is exploring ways to enhance competition and make sure that consumers have access to a broader range of services in order to get the best deal around, when it comes to mortgages, savings products, insurance, banks accounts etc.

In the long term, count 2017/2018, we can expect further steps to support SME growth markets and private placements, along with plans for a pan-European Pension Fund. As already mentioned earlier, matters regarding withholding tax and insolvency law will get attention as well.

Benefits for companies

All in all, CMU certainly has a fully packed and ambitious agenda. Now what’s in it for companies, really? Potentially a lot. However, we appreciate that the road to a real CMU may be a far longer one. 2019 seems awfully close for some of the changes to  happen. Rebalancing financial intermediation for example will most probably be a gradual, organic process that will go hand in hand with political interests, FinTech developments etc., rather than a major shift on a particular point in time.

Also, it will need a change in mind-set and behaviour by all stakeholders involved. The effects of a CMU may be more pronounced for the corporate sectors of certain countries with relatively small capital markets. For these countries, some of the initiatives could be particularly beneficial. Their domestic capital markets may currently not be able to cater for their large corporates, pushing them away to international markets. CMU could bring them back home and expand their markets.

The benefits of CMU will be different for the different types of companies:

  • Start-ups will get special attention, as their innovation and entrepreneurial spirit are key to Europe’s growth potential. At this moment start-ups can turn to crowdfunding, but this is only developing and there is already some investment by business angels. However, these funding channels remain small and local and will not always provide the necessary funding at critical moments in their expansion. The initiatives to step up venture capital for example may be particular beneficial in that respect.
  • Small companies that are struggling to get bank funding, especially in those countries that have been hit the hardest by the crisis, may unlock more funding via securitization. SMEs in particular could be positively impacted, as the intended side effect would be that securitisation allows banks to step up the lending capacity, knowing that bank lending for this type of corporates may remain a very important source of funding. Next to that, the European Commission also wants to work closely together with the SME growth markets, a new market sub-category created under MiFID II to facilitate access to capital for SMEs, to ensure that the regulatory environment for these markets delivers the expected results.
  • Medium and large-sized companies, which may already have access to capital markets, should also feel the effects as CMU will support investors who wish to place larger amounts of capital in the market. The initiative to promote private placements, building on successful experiences such as the one in Germany and through supporting market-led initiatives such as the one by ICMA on the use of standardized documentation could be quite helpful. Tackling tax issues could come in helpful as well.

What is important too is that the European Commission is also planning to review the functioning of the European corporate bond market and to see how market liquidity can be improved. A well-functioning secondary market will be crucial for the success of the primary debt markets.

So all in all, the Capital Markets Union is an ambitious, yet challenging plan of the European Commission. Ambitious because it intends to reengineer Europe’s traditional funding channels. Challenging because of the wide range of issues that need to be tackled to get there and the tight deadline. The outcome should be that corporates meet with investors in an efficient market place, thus broadening the scope of options for both parties to contribute to economic growth.

(Source: Focus Magazine CIB)

 

Article

24.10.2016

Kilometervergoeding voor elektrische fiets niet altijd fiscaal vrijgesteld

Werknemers die met de fiets naar het werk rijden, kunnen een fietsvergoeding krijgen tot 22 eurocent per kilometer. De regeling geldt in principe ook voor elektrische fietsen. Sommige modellen zoals de speed pedelec, vallen echter uit de boot.

De elektrische fiets wint terrein: ruim één op vier verkochte tweewielers is een elektrisch exemplaar.  Steeds meer mensen gebruiken hun fiets ook om te pendelen. Werkgevers kunnen hun fietsende medewerkers een fietsvergoeding uitbetalen. Tot 0,22 EUR per kilometer is die vergoeding fiscaal onbelast. Het moet dan wel gaan om een “klassieke” elektrische fiets:

  • met een maximumsnelheid van 25 km/u;
  • met een motor van maximum 250 watt;
  • met trapondersteuning, wat betekent dat de fietser ook moet trappen, er mag dus geen sprake zijn van een autonome motor.

Niet voor speed-pedelecs

Die voordelige regeling geldt dus niet voor speed pedelecs, zeg maar de Formule 1-versie van de elektrische fiets. Speed pedelecs kunnen snelheden tot 45 km/u halen. Sinds 1 oktober moeten bestuurders daarom een helm, rijbewijs en verzekering hebben.

Voor alle duidelijkheid: pendelaars die gebruik maken van een speed pedelec kunnen wel degelijk een kilometervergoeding krijgen van hun baas. Maar die uitkering wordt dan wel  beschouwd als een belastbaar inkomen. De werknemer zal dus zowel RSZ als bedrijfsvoorheffing moeten betalen. Op die regel bestaat één uitzondering: medewerkers die kiezen voor een forfaitaire aftrek van hun beroepskosten. Zij hebben recht op een fiscale vrijstelling van maximum 380 EUR.

Wat met bedrijfsfietsen?

Werkgevers kunnen hun medewerkers een fiets ook ter beschikking stellen. Alle kosten die daaruit voortvloeien, onder andere het onderhoud, zijn vrijgesteld van belastingen. Voorwaarde is dat de medewerker de fiets daadwerkelijk gebruikt voor zijn woon-werkverkeer, al zijn zuivere privé-verplaatsingen ook toegestaan. Deze regeling geldt alleen voor de klassieke elektrische fietsen. Speed pedelecs vallen (opnieuw) niet onder deze fiscale vrijstelling.

(Bron: Partena)
Article

14.12.2016

Tant qu’il y aura des data…

Het ultieme doel van big data? Een unieke klantervaring creëren. Maar waarom lukt het een start-up zonder verleden om affectief te zijn, terwijl oudere bedrijven met tonnen data maar wat graag dichter bij hun klanten willen staan? Wat is de winnende formule?

Digitale gegevens opslaan en verwerken is niet nieuw. Datamining ook niet. Maar connected devices en mobiele toepassingen creëren letterlijk een tsunami aan gegevens. Sms'jes, chats, foto's, filmpjes, muzieklijsten, zoekopdrachten, clicks op het net, routeberekeningen op Google Maps en aanverwanten, onlinebetalingen, contacten met klanten via chatbots of e-mail, automatische bestellingen door slimme koelkasten ... We produceren de hele tijd gegevens zonder er ook maar even bij stil te staan! Ook als we akkoord gaan met geolocatie of wanneer we inloggen op een hotspot ...
Tegen 2020 zal het datavolume allicht vervijfvoudigen.  Zo genereert een geconnecteerde wagen in amper één uur miljoenen gegevens die niet alleen nuttig zijn voor de auto zélf, maar ook voor de verzekeraars en de e-commerce. Er staat veel op het spel: een strategie bijsturen, een service personaliseren, betere beslissingen nemen, tendensen opsporen, prognoses maken ...

Old-school statistici interpreteerden cijfers uit het verleden om voor een betere toekomst te zorgen. Hedendaagse  “data scientists' zijn geeks, er worden academische opleidingen georganiseerd en we zijn mentaal niet meer in staat om het explosieve groeitempo van de gegevens bij te houden. Alleen machines kunnen dergelijke gegevensstromen nog verwerken. Dankzij automatische leertechnieken ('machine learning') gebeurt dat beter en sneller. Er zou een standaard voor correct gebruik van artificiële intelligentie in de maak zijn op initiatief van kleppers als Google, Facebook, Amazon, IBM en Microsoft. Volgens Nicolas Méric, oprichter en CEO van de start-up DreamQuark, gespecialiseerd in deep learning in de gezondheids- en verzekeringssector, verhogen dergelijke technologieën de menselijke capaciteiten, maar zijn ze niet bedoeld om volledig autonoom  te werken.

Wie komt in aanmerking?

Geen enkele sector ontsnapt aan de behoefte om gegevens te verzamelen en die te gebruiken om zijn omgeving nuttig aan te passen. Maar de ene is al gehaaster – of opportunistischer– dan de andere. Telecommunicatie, transport, gas-, water- en elektriciteitsleveranciers nemen het voortouw: de Franse spoorwegen maar ook schoonheidsproductenfabrikant Nuxe speuren alle onlinekanalen af op zoek naar klantencommentaren om hun klanten beter te leren kennen. Liftenfabrikant ThyssenKrupp wil zijn liften en vooral de gebruikers ervan optimaal bedienen en verzamelt allerhande liftparameters om het onderhoud te optimaliseren en vervelende storingen te voorkomen.
Big-data-managers in bedrijven staan voor drie grote uitdagingen, ook wel bekend als de '3V's': grote Volumes verwerken, rekening houden met de oneindige Variatie van gegevens en omgaan met de Velocity of snelheid waarmee ze worden gegenereerd.
Banken ontsnappen daar niet aan. Ze hebben er zelfs enorm veel bij te winnen, want ze beschikken over tonnen transactionele informatie over hun klanten en creëren allerhande processen. Zij staan dus voor de uitdaging om zelf ook met die schat aan gegevens aan de slag te gaan en binnen een zo kort mogelijk tijdsbestek nieuwe diensten met toegevoegde waarde uit te testen.

Momentum

Jean-François Vanderschrick is Head of Marketing Analytics & Research bij BNP Paribas Fortis: "Wat mij fascineert is niet zozeer de hoeveelheid beschikbare gegevens en connected devices, als wel wat de technologie er tegenwoordig allemaal uithaalt. Er gaat geen dag voorbij zonder dat ik van iets nieuws opkijk. JP Morgan komt tendensen op het spoor door foto's te kopen van de bezetting van supermarktparkings. China ontwikkelt gelaatsherkenning om de lay-out van zijn interfaces aan te passen aan de gelaatsuitdrukking van zijn klanten. Sokken 'made in USA' kunnen we volgen zodra ze verzonden worden totdat we ze in huis hebben ... Het is allemaal onderdeel van ons dagelijkse leven. Net zoals een bank die zich wil gaan aanpassen aan de levensfase waarin haar klant – die ze volgt sinds hij een rekening heeft – zich bevindt om hem precies datgene aan te bieden wat nuttig voor hem is."

BNP Paribas Fortis zette onlangs een nieuwe stap in de dataverwerking met de benoeming van een Chief Data Officer die lid is van het uitvoerend comité, Jo Couture. Dat betekent ook dat er meer mankracht, nieuwe tools en nieuwe capaciteiten onderweg zijn.

Jean-François Vanderschrick: "Data analytics moet ons in staat stellen om de klantervaring te verbeteren en de kosten onder controle te houden. Meestal gaat dat samen met een verhoogde efficiency."

Volgens hem belandt de leercurve nu pas in de exponentiële fase terecht.  

De timing is even belangrijk als de service zelf

Data komen in heel wat domeinen van pas: operationele excellentie, marketing, fraudedetectie, kredietrisico ... De bedrijven hebben intussen ingezien dat ze hun gegevens in kennis en diensten moeten omzetten en hebben vaak alles in huis om dat goed te doen, op voorwaarde dat ze zich niet door de oceaan van gegevens laten overspoelen. Het moeilijkste – en een bron van frustratie – is wellicht het ontsluiten en kwalificeren van de gegevens. Compliance-aspecten hebben de natuurlijke neiging om de ontwikkeling af te remmen, terwijl een kortere data -to -market juist heel belangrijk is. Dikwijls laat de marktintroductie te lang op zich wachten. Verder is het van belang om een service in real time aan te bieden. Supermarktketen Monoprix analyseert bijvoorbeeld het verwerkingsproces van de 200.000 dagelijkse bestellingen van zijn 800 winkels om onmiddellijk te kunnen ingrijpen op de supply chain. Voor de Franse winkelketen is dat een kritiek proces.

"Er moet een juiste dosering worden gevonden tussen tests (het prototype van de service oogt dikwijls bijzonder fraai, maar het veralgemenen ervan lukt niet altijd), risicometing en prioritering van de doelstellingen", zegt Jean-François Vanderschrick.

Het algoritme 'opvoeden'

Als je over de gegevens en de technologie beschikt en er financiële belangen meespelen, staat er geen grens op het ontsluiten van de gegevenswaarde. Je verbeelding is de enige beperking. Naast grote en complexe projecten zijn ook hier vrij eenvoudige quick wins mogelijk en wenselijk. Zo kunnen de operationele directies van de onderneming elementaire analyses verrichten op grote gegevensvolumes.

"Er zijn heel wat soorten gegevens die er misschien volstrekt onbelangrijk uitzien, maar die toch informatie verschaffen en tot actie aanzetten: een klant die met de concurrentie werkt, die elders kredietlijnen opent of een zeer groot bedrag leent, die met een ander land werkt ... Al die gegevens verdienen onze aandacht vanuit commercieel oogpunt,  in 70 procent van de gevallen zijn ze relevant", voegt de BNP Paribas Fortis manager eraan toe. Door het transactionele model van een klant te onderzoeken kunnen we betere kredietbeslissingen nemen. Relevante beslissingen liggen meer voor de hand met een model dan zonderweet Jean-François Vanderschrick. "Via machine learning leren we het algoritme om antwoorden te geven die meer en meer to the point zijn", voegt hij eraan toe.

'Big is better', ook voor kleine ondernemingen?

Dankzij de cloud hebben kmo's vandaag de nodige opslag – en rekencapaciteit – om de gegevens te verwerken. Bedrijfsmanagementprogramma's die gebruikmaken van de cloud-technologie, zoals CRM, tools om bestellingen of productiekosten of de traceerbaarheid van leveranciers te volgen, maken big data toegankelijk voor kleine en middelgrote ondernemingen. Op één voorwaarde: dat alle gegevens op dezelfde plaats samengebracht worden. Het verschil tussen corporates en kmo's speelt zich af op lange termijn. Maar kmo's voor wie eenstatisticus te duur is, kunnen altijd specifieke studies kopen en hun gegevens uitbreiden met externe databases ...

(Bronnen: BNP Paribas Fortis, Les Echos, Transparency Market Research, IDC, Ernst & Young, CXP, Data Business)

 

 

Article

27.12.2016

These 4 giants from Silicon Valley want to seduce your IT management

Already champions in everyday life, Google, Facebook, Slack and LinkedIn are adopting innovative and complementary approaches to convert companies. What strategies are they implementing in order to convince you?

Google: the value of data intelligence

Google is adopting an approach which goes beyond communication tools and suites of productivity apps/services. The company has largely transformed its business divisions so that they can exploit cloud infrastructures, big data, analytics and machine learning as a matter of priority. Two competitors are blocking it along the way: Amazon and Microsoft, but for different reasons. Developers have been using Amazon Web Services for a long time, which gives it a history of trust. Microsoft (Cloud, Office) also has a historical presence in IT departments around the world. In this approach, linked to the processing of sensitive data, Google still needs to evangelise: a company is not as easily convinced as a consumer, particularly when it comes to strategic or confidential data. Its weapon: the power of its artificial intelligence tools to process data silos.

Facebook: introducing WorkPlace, naturally

After more than a year of development with partner companies such as Danone, Starbucks, Royal Bank of Scotland and Booking.com, Facebook officially launched WorkPlace last October. This Facebook spin-off enables organisations to create an internal social network - completely private and secure - within an interface familiar to all employees in their everyday life, introducing head-on competition for already widespread tools such as Chatter (Salesforce) or Yammer (Microsoft). Unlike free Facebook, WorkPlace is billed monthly depending on the number of users: $3 for the first 1,000, $2 for the next 9,000 $1 for over 10,000 users.

Slack: real-time collaboration becomes mainstream

Despite the introduction of Microsoft Teams on its turf, Slack remains confident in its strategy of creating tools that allow greater communication and productivity within companies.

"We find this offensive both flattering as well as intimidating, given Microsoft's means, but we think there is sufficient space in the market for several players", declared April Underwood, VP of Slack at the beginning of November.

A market that Slack has largely contributed to opening and driving, by introducing the concept of real-time collaboration. Its weapon? Agility, despite its still limited size and its proven and copied tools. Result: 4 million active users everyday and constant growth.

LinkedIn: from B2B marketing for... Microsoft

Microsoft Closes Acquisition of LinkedIn at the beginning of December. The transaction, which runs into billions of euros, has been followed closely by the European Commission. Despite a strong position in the business, mainly at a human resources level, LinkedIn needs 25 billion euros from Microsoft to pursue its offensive in the domain of professional tools, in a hugely competitive climate. For Microsoft, the acquisition will enable the company to reach B2B marketing targets such as recruitment agencies, head-hunters and businesses. To explain the synergy sought in simple terms, the CEO of Microsoft, Satya Nadella, gives the example of a meeting where everyone present sees their LinkedIn profile, linked to their invitation.

Discover More

Contact
Close

Contact

Complaints

We would like you to answer a few questions. This will help us answer your request faster and in a more appropriate manner. Thank you in advance.

Is your company/organisation client at BNP Paribas Fortis?

My organisation is being served by a Relationship Manager :

Your message

Type the code shown in the image:

captcha
The Bank processes your personal data in accordance with the terms of the Privacy Notice of BNP Paribas Fortis SA/NV.

Thank you

Your message has been sent.

We will respond as soon as possible.

Back to the current page›
Top