Article

31.01.2017

Why should innovation be at the core of your company?

Digital natives are increasingly outperforming traditional companies, according to a study. It's therefore time to start setting the right priorities within your IT management.

Bain & Company surveyed more than 450 representatives of traditional companies on behalf of the publisher Red Hat (higher management, IT management and developers). Initially, the survey (entitled ‘Traditional Enterprises, the Path to Digital and the Role of Containers’) was focused on containers, one of the most up-to-date development platforms within digital transformation strategy. Ultimately, the survey produced information on subjects other than technological factors, which was the aspect chosen as the initial focus for discovering how far along the companies were in their digital transformations.

An objective that pays off

The study shows that companies that want to use new technologies, aim to improve their flexibility, provide their customers with new services and make cost savings. The study established that companies that have invested heavily in IT experience positive results, such as:

  • An increase in their market share, which is eight times higher than for companies that are just beginning their digital transformations;
  • Faster launches of higher-quality products due to more intensive use of new technology. According to the study, these companies take their products to market three times faster;
  • And finally, improved development processes which result in shorter launch times and reduced costs.

Digital natives are profiting

Despite efforts, the situation for digitally advanced traditional companies and start-ups is not the same. Bain & Company's report argues that the progress made in the respondents' digital transformations varies strongly. However, companies in the digital sector – the digital natives – are, of course, experiencing greater advancements. 63% of the companies surveyed are developing processes for responding to technological trends, but only 19% gave speed of innovation as a priority, while 65% of the companies are much more reactive than proactive.

Jeff Taylor, co-author of the study, states that too many companies put off taking measures that will enable them to climb higher on the digital ladder:

"Companies that are advancing further and faster on the adoption curve treat digital as more than just a singular function or activity. They value it more. They view it as a comprehensive, cross-functional transformation, implementing changes across their leadership, organisation, product development approach and processes, IT strategy and investments, data governance and tools, and a whole lot more besides."

(Source : Bain.com) 

Article

07.12.2020

Scale-up concludes mega contract in the midst of the coronavirus crisis

The Antwerp-based scale-up IPEE transforms ordinary toilets into innovative products. BNP Paribas Fortis is more than just the financial partner. IPEE have already come into contact with the right people via the bank’s network several times.

“The traditional urinal has no brain. The infrared eye simply detects that someone is standing in front of the urinal. The result? A lot of wasted water and misery”, says Bart Geraets, who founded IPEE in 2012 together with Jan Schoeters.

The scale-up devised new measuring technology that makes it possible to detect through the ceramic of a urinal when someone is urinating or when the urinal is blocked. With this innovative technology, the scale-up designed urinals that use half as much water and toilets that can be operated without touching them.

Sleek design

“IPEE is an atypical scale-up that innovates in a sector where little has changed in the past few decades”, says Conchita Vercauteren, relationship manager at the BNP Paribas Fortis Innovation Hub.

Jan Schoeters: “At first we mainly focused on durability. But we soon felt that with non-residential applications, the potential water saving is subordinate to the operational aspect. We had to be able to offer added value for each stakeholder in the purchasing process.”

We opted for sleek designs to appeal to architects and end users. The simple installation attracts fitters and maintenance people see the advantages of the sleek design - that is easy to clean - and toilets that do not overflow.

New investors

Until 2015, Schoeters and Geraets, along with Victor Claes, an expert in measuring methods and originator of the IPEE technology, put their energy into product development and market research. The financing came mainly from money that they collected in their network of friends, fools and family.

They had to go elsewhere to obtain the funds for production and marketing. Geraets: “We had a product, but it wasn’t ready to sell. To take that step, we needed investors.”

Looking for new investors was a challenge. Schoeters: “We aren’t software developers and we don’t work in a sexy sector. So we miss out with a large target group of investors.”

The young scale-up attracted the attention of Ronald Kerckhaert, who had sold his successful company, Sax Sanitair, at the end of 2015. “He pushed us to think big, more than we dared ourselves. And he never headed for an exit. His express goal was to put our product on the world market”, says Schoeters.

Growth path

IPEE has achieved impressive growth since then. The product range was expanded and new sectors were broached: educational institutes, office buildings and hospitals. The technology is now used by Kinepolis, Texaco, Schiphol and Changi Airport (Singapore).

“We very soon turned to Asia, because new technology is embraced more quickly there”, Geraets explains. The IPEE technology is distributed in Singapore - where the scale-up has its own sales office - China, Thailand and Vietnam, among other places. About half the turnover comes from abroad, although the coronavirus crisis will leave its mark this year.

Supporter

“My biggest headache is achieving healthy growth”, says Bart Geraets. One advantage for IPEE is that in coronavirus times, hygiene stands high on the agenda. The scale-up's  touchless toilet facilities meet that demand.

At the same time, the shortage of water and the need to use water sparingly is very topical. Geraets: “We notice that in these strange times we are gaining an even bigger foothold. In the midst of the coronavirus crisis we concluded a contract with the world’s biggest manufacture of toilet facilities. Now it’s a matter of further professionalising our business, the personnel policy and the marketing.”

The company’s main bank is an important partner here. Schoeters: “It is more than just a financial organisation. We have already come into contact with the right people via the bank’s network several times. Our bank feels more like a supporter that is also putting its weight behind our story.”

Article

02.06.2020

#StrongerTogether Lasea decontaminates masks using lasers

Lasea conceives precision laser solutions for high-tech industry. Faced with the coronavirus crisis, the Liège enterprise revived an old project to decontaminate surgical masks – and respond to the shortage of face coverings.

The secret weapon of Lasea is the femtosecond laser. This has an accuracy of 0.2 micron, 200 times smaller than a hair. Lasea’s high-tech equipment is notably used in horology, electronics, medicine and pharmaceuticals. Given the shortage of surgical masks, the Liège enterprise revived an old project for decontaminating, as Lasea CEO Axel Kupisiewicz explains.

“We had tested laser decontamination 20 years ago. At the time, the project had no commercial outlets. With the coronavirus crisis, we proposed using it to decontaminate used surgical masks. That’s how we joined a consortium managed by the University of Liège to develop a decontamination chain. Usually, it takes many months, even years, to carry out the tests and obtain certification. Thanks to the collaboration between the university and the Walloon government, everything was done in a few weeks.”

Reinvention thanks to a crisis

Lasea proposed two decontamination techniques. “For the first, we used a laser device manufactured by Aseptic Technologies from Gembloux, which we adapted to meet local needs,” explains Mr Kupisiewicz. “For the second, we have entered into a partnership with Optec, in Mons. This latter solution makes it possible to treat three or four times as many masks each day.”

Lockdown has also generated a new dynamic within the business. “We launched a brainstorming session to refine the strategy for the coming years. The result: a new organisation after the move to our new building, financed by BNP Paribas Fortis. On the other hand, the widespread use of videoconferencing has created a new dynamic at the heart of the company. Previously, the Belgian team, who were gathered physically on site in Liège, were in a way privileged in meetings with their French, American or Swiss colleagues, present via videoconferencing. Now, everyone is on an equal footing because everyone is behind their screen by themselves. It’s one of the interesting aspects of lockdown that has created a global spirit in an international group.”

A relationship of trust

“BNP Paribas Fortis has been by our side since the beginning, 21 years ago,” recalls Mr Kupisiewicz. “First via the local branch in Sart-Tilman and now, for seven years, via Corporate Banking. Given Lasea’s developments, enlargement to several banks was necessary, but BNP Paribas Fortis remains the primary bank. I place huge importance on personal relationships and a climate of trust. Be it the branch manager or staff at Corporate, our relationship managers know our activities and our products. It’s important: they understand the issues we face and as a result they know our financial needs.”

“Since the beginning of the crisis, the bank has asked if we need support to develop this project of decontaminating masks. We have been able to implement these solutions by redeploying our teams and we have not needed a large injection of capital. We have, on the other hand, welcomed the moratorium on repayment of capital on all our investment credits.”

Article

18.05.2020

#StrongerTogether Wearable tech guarantees distance between workers

The Antwerp technology company Rombit has developed a safety bracelet for workers in ports and industrial settings. This guarantees social distancing, and also allows for contact tracing in the event of coronavirus infections.

Since 2012, Rombit has developed digital applications for maritime businesses, port terminals, the industry and building sites. Its software and hardware solutions aim to make operational activities more efficient, safe and dynamic. For the purposes of social distancing, the company has now launched a smart bracelet: the Romware Covid Radius.

“This wearable tech guarantees 1.5m distancing,” explains CEO John Baekelmans. “If two employees get too close to each other, it sets off an alert. Thanks to contact tracing, a prevention advisor or confidential counsellor can check which colleagues an infected worker has come into contact with. Their privacy is 100% guaranteed. That is unique.”

Huge interest

The Romware Covid Radius is a variation on the existing Romware ONE: a bracelet that brings together 20 safety functions, including access control, an incident tracking system and an alarm for approaching vehicles. In just two weeks, Rombit optimised a derivative solution that facilitates safe working during the coronavirus outbreak.

“An extensive test of the Romware Covid Radius is being carried out in the Port of Antwerp,” says Mr Baekelmans. “Roll-out to other businesses will follow and they will integrate our safety bracelet into their new way of working. There is already huge interest at home and abroad. We are talking with some major players in the industrial sector.”

Social responsibility

In response to the great interest in the Romware Covid Radius, Rombit has already markedly increased its production in Taiwan. Mr Baekelmans also expects a growing need for short-term financing. “Close cooperation with your lender is essential,” he says. “In BNP Paribas Fortis, we have a good partner.”

“Rombit is part of the BNP Paribas Fortis Innovation hub,” says relationship manager Conchita Vercauteren. “With the hub, the bank supports innovative start-ups and scale-ups that are contributing to a better society. The fact that Rombit wants to distribute its coronavirus solution so widely and at as low a cost as possible clearly testifies to social responsibility.” 

Article

08.05.2020

#StrongerTogether: BeWell Innovations screens for coronavirus infections

The Antwerp scale-up BeWell Innovations has developed an app that screens the risk of coronavirus infections. The company has also launched a platform that monitors patients with mild symptoms at home and sends their details to the hospital treating them.

Using a questionnaire, the Covid@Home app assesses symptoms that could indicate coronavirus infection. Based on the answers, it estimates the risk of infection and advises the user on whether they should contact their GP. BeWell Innovations does this using an algorithm it developed with the expertise of UZ Gent. The app is also overseen by the government.

The young company has also placed self-test kiosks in hospitals. “They combine a questionnaire with measurements of temperature, blood pressure, oxygen saturation and weight,” explains CEO Alain Mampuya. “This is how an initial triage takes place, leaving doctors and nursing staff to concentrate on the people who are actually infected.”

Controlled recovery

The Covid@Home platform has a monitoring system that allows patients with mild coronavirus symptoms to recover at home in a controlled way. “They have to complete a questionnaire every day and register vital parameters such as temperature, blood pressure and oxygen saturation,” says Mampuya. “These details are automatically sent to the hospital.”

Thanks to this digital tracking, patients and doctors can be assured of close monitoring. The information is translated into specific alarm signals: based on these, medical staff can decide to hospitalise the patient at any time. The platform also makes remote consultations possible via videoconferencing.

Support from the bank

BeWell Innovations is part of the BNP Paribas Fortis Innovation hub. “This is a community of promising start-ups and scale-ups,” explains relationship manager Conchita Vercauteren. “As a bank, we approach them differently to traditional businesses: we focus on the future and not on the past. We want to contribute to useful innovations for our society.”

“BNP Paribas Fortis has played a crucial role in our growth,” says Mampuya. “The financing of a start-up or scale-up is not without risks, and the bank has always stuck its neck out for us. As a result, BeWell Innovations has been able to do its own thing, without being dependent on an investment group.”

Discover More

Contact
Close

Contact

Complaints

We would like you to answer a few questions. This will help us answer your request faster and in a more appropriate manner. Thank you in advance.

You are self-employed, exercise a liberal profession, are starting up or managing a smaller local company. Then visit our website for professionals.

You are an individual? Then visit our website for individuals .

Is your company/organisation client at BNP Paribas Fortis?

My organisation is being served by a Relationship Manager :

Your message

Type the code shown in the image:

captcha
Check
The Bank processes your personal data in accordance with the terms of the Privacy Notice of BNP Paribas Fortis SA/NV.

Thank you

Your message has been sent.

We will respond as soon as possible.

Back to the current page›
Top